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Holiday Reflections

by Published: Nov 20, 2013

Holidays can be an absolute pain.

Whether dri­ving hours and hours packed in a car with your sib­lings to Grandma’s house or scrupu­lously cook­ing and clean­ing under Mom’s tyran­ni­cal direc­tion in prepa­ra­tion for the arrival of rel­a­tives, hol­i­days can be any­thing but relaxing.

Amidst the com­mut­ing, cook­ing, clean­ing and gen­eral chaos, it’s easy to lose sight this time of year of what’s really impor­tant. Sometimes we need a lit­tle reminder to put things into per­spec­tive for us.

On the front page of this issue, I had the priv­i­lege of shar­ing Taylor Pike’s story with you. In late October, Pike’s heart stopped while he was work­ing out at TNT Gym.

Before I even knew Pike’s name, I was con­tacted on the evening of the inci­dent by the Pioneer and asked if I had heard any­thing about a stu­dent dying. Pioneer reporters had received a tip that a young man had passed out while exer­cis­ing. Witnesses said he didn’t have a heartbeat.

After a lit­tle social media dig­ging, I learned Pike was still alive and recov­er­ing in the hos­pi­tal. My first feel­ings were those of relief—something uncom­mon for me since empa­thy isn’t one of my most preva­lent qualities.

Having just learned Pike’s name, I had no asso­ci­a­tion with him other than the fact we were stu­dents at the same uni­ver­sity and approx­i­mately the same age. Yet, in search­ing for whether he was still alive or not, I couldn’t help but put myself in his shoes.

One minute he was lift­ing with his bud­dies. The next minute he was med­ically dead. In just sixty sec­onds, his whole world nearly came to an unex­pected end.

Fortunately by noth­ing short of a mir­a­cle, Pike sur­vived. He gets to live to see what will hope­fully be many more hec­tic hol­i­day cel­e­bra­tions. In his inter­view, he told me the inci­dent made him real­ize he was tak­ing things for granted.

So this hol­i­day, in honor of Pike’s mirac­u­lous sur­vival story, step back and appre­ci­ate your sur­round­ings, even if it’s utter crazi­ness. That moment may be fren­zied, but you might as well enjoy it because who knows if it will be your last.